Home | Lansdowne Crescent

April 29, 2009

Chapter 44

Jean Day, concluding her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester Crescent, tells what happened to some of the people in her book.

To read this book from the beginning click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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April 22, 2009

Chapter 43

...What a loss this decade has dealt to our family, to our road, and of course to the country and the world. We can only hope that the dawn of 1920 will be a better time for us all...

The war ends and the survivors begin to piece their lives together.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Wrocester crescent.

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April 15, 2009

Chapter 42

Here are more tributes to Mr Tree, a loyal servant to the town in which he lived, Worcester.

Jean Day continues her well-researched account of the lives of Worcester citizens who were neighbours in the early decades of last century.

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April 08, 2009

Chapter 41

...The Mayor said he had been asked the attendance of his brother magistrates and members of the local bar in order that they might make a record of the loss of the city as their late friend, Mr. Tree. In spite of all the experience of the four or five years he did not think that the hand of sorrow had fallen more heavily on any one family than upon the family of Mr. Tree...

The Mayor of Worcester paid tribute to one of the city’s most loyal servants.

Jean Day continues her account of what happened to neighbours in a Worcester Crescent during the early decades of last century.

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April 01, 2009

Chapter 40

Jean Day, continuing her account of the lives of neighbours in Worcester in the early decades of last century, records the death of the doyen of the town’s solicitors.

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March 25, 2009

Chapter 39

…War! How little that really conveyed to us a few short years ago. We who have lived for so long in peace in our island home, what did we know and understand of the inner meaning of that word, which now has so pregnant and ominous a sound in our ears?...

The author reflects on the enormous cost of The WaR To End Wars.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester Crescent in the opening decades of last century.

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March 18, 2009

Chapter 38

…Little Betty every night still prays for ‘Uncle Frank, Uncle Charlie, and now also for Uncle Pete.’ And we, whatever be our belief as to the future life, and however much at times our faith may waver, know in our hearts that the instinct of a little child is right, and that somewhere ‘beyond the stars’ they still go forward, and can be prayed and lived for…

A child’s prayer represents the depths of the sadness of those who lost relatives and friends in the Great War.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester crescent.

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March 11, 2009

Chapter 37

…Unless the class hatred, which is now to a large extent dying down, is forever buried, and unless every class of society strives to treat the other, not with tolerance but with something much more than that, then never again shall we be able to look those in the face who have fallen to prepare this for us….

Jean Day’s latest chapter in her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester crescent brings reflections on the effects of the war.

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March 04, 2009

Chapter 36

Another of the close group of Worcester neighbours dies in the brutal and bloody World War.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of people who lived in a Worcester crescent in the early part of the Twentieth Century. To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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February 25, 2009

Chapter 35

Christmas was celebrated in the usual way on the home front during wartime.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester Street in the early decades of the Twentieth Century.

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February 18, 2009

Chapter 34

…It is difficult to give to those who have not shared in them an understanding of what was the charm of those Hampstead days. It was due almost entirely, of course, to the personality of those two who so generously gave us the shelter of their home, and Peter and I owe them a debt of gratitude which we can never repay. It became, indeed, a kind of second home to us…

While the Great War raged in Europe some still managed to grab weekends of civilized living.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in the city of Worcester during the early decades of the Twentieth Century.

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February 11, 2009

Chapter 33

The news from the war front remains grim.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester crescent during the early decades of the Twentieth Century.

To read preceding chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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February 04, 2009

Chapter 32

…Peter understood with perhaps a vision clearer than we who have not faced and tasted death the splendid self-abnegation of womanhood. A woman giving freely of her first-born-of those who have lisped their first prayers at her knee-to go forth to die, while she remains in dry-eyed agony at home…

Jean Day presents another poignant letter as she continues her account of people who were neighbours in Worcester during the early decades of the Twentieth Century.

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January 28, 2009

Chapter 31

‘Who is the man with the beautiful face? But how sad it is for such a young man.’

Friends and relatives bear a burden of grief and enduring sadness as young men die in battle.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in the town of Worcester during the early decades of the Twentieth Century.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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January 21, 2009

Chapter 30

Frank Tree loses his life in the greatest battle in the world.

Jean Day continues her account of what befell the residents pf a Worcester crescent in the early decades of last century.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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January 14, 2009

Chapter 29

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in the town of Worcester in the early days of the Twentieth Century.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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January 07, 2009

Chapter 28

Jean Day tells of deadlock during World War One between British and Turkish troops.

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December 31, 2008

Chapter 27

There’s an account of a war-time wedding in the latest chapter of Jean Day’s account of the lives of the residents of a Worcester crescent during the early decades of last century.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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December 24, 2008

Chapter 26

…It's not the big troubles of life that are hard to bear, but the petty trifles of every day. It's doubly true out here. Anyone can smile in face of death. It's far harder to grin and bear it when your overcoat's wet through and weighs about sixty pounds, and your feet are so cold you don't know whether they're your own, and there's no chance of a mail for another five days.’..

Letters bring news of conditions in the World War One trenches.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester crescent in the early days of the Twentieth Century.

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December 17, 2008

Chapter 25

‘You do not know, perhaps, that part of mine and Lucy's creed is contained in Browning's Epilogue? May you be able ‘to greet the unseen with a cheer,’ and to you who believe in the life after death I trust you can find something to help you to look forward…

Frank writes from France on hearing of the death in battle of his great friend Charlie.

Jean Day continues her story of the events which befell friends and neighbours living in a Worcester Crescent a century ago.

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December 10, 2008

Chapter 24

Charlie’s last letter from the front line at Galipoli makes the horrors of warfare all too real.

Jean Day continues her account of Worcester neighbours, in peace and war.

To read earlier chapters of the story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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December 03, 2008

Chapter 23

In the latest chapter of her book concerning the residents of a Worcester crescent Jean Day tells of men at war.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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November 26, 2008

Chapter 22

..Charlie was not so fond as the other two boys. I remember his terror one day in early August when I asked him to hold our new niece, Betty, then nearly six months old, while I made her bottle ready. ‘For goodness sake let me get her food while you hold her. I shall break her!’…

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in a Worcester crescent a century ago.

To read earlier chapters of her story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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November 19, 2008

Chapter 21

…On another occasion the boys fried us some potatoes for dinner, and at intervals during the meal kept giving guffaws of laughter. The potatoes were voted awfully good, which brought forth fresh bursts of merriment. We discovered afterwards that in dishing up the potatoes they had emptied the contents of the frying pan on to the floor, and scooped them up into the dish. Ignorance is bliss, and the potatoes were excellent…

Jean Day charts the lives of friends and neighbours who lived in the city of Worcester in the early days of last century.

To read earlier chapters of Jean’s story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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November 12, 2008

Chapter 20

…That holiday too, like the walking tour of the preceding year, was a very happy one. We were a large party, the whole family, except Charlie (who was speedily making himself a millionaire by coaching dukes' sons at the rate of about £20 a day), and several friends. We filled two houses, and hit on the most sensible plan of having the quiet members of the party in one house and the noisy members in the other, and of course freely interchanging…

Jean Day tells of a group of friends from the town of Worcester who still managed to enjoy a holiday just after the outbreak of World War One.

To read earlier chapters of Jean’s book please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent

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November 05, 2008

Chapter 19

...He is a great reader, but chiefly of books on social and political subjects; latterly he has given up all fiction, and will not allow that a novel could have any good educational influence. He urges the closing of circulating libraries on the ground that their standard of fiction is so poor. He frequently talks to clerks at bookstalls in order to find for what papers there are in the greatest demand and was disgusted when he was told that a certain weekly illustrated paper was largely bought especially by women....

Jean Day continues her real-life account of certain Worcester folk at the beginning of the Twentieth Century.

To read earlier chapters of Jean’s story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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October 29, 2008

Chapter 18

…Harold is somewhat worried about the rumours of war that we hear occasionally. What do your brothers think? I am afraid that Harold’s brothers are very poor correspondents, so we get little home news from the man’s point of view…

Muriel, with apprehensions about the future, writes from South Africa.

Jean Day continues her account of the folk who lived in the city of Worcester a century ago. To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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October 22, 2008

Chapter 17

A party of young friends and neighbours continue their holiday in Devon.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of people who lived around a hundred years ago in the town of Worcester.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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October 15, 2008

Chapter 16

…It was a great experience, a taste of absolute freedom, with never a care in the world. I know not which is the most exhilarating feeling, shouldering one's knapsack the first thing in the morning and getting into one's stride to go forth one knows not whither, or taking it off at night and spending a twilight of well-earned rest in the contemplation of the day's achievements and of tomorrow's possibilities….

Eight friends going on a walking tour in North Devon.

Jean Day continues her account of the lives of neighbours in the town of Worcester around a century ago.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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October 08, 2008

Chapter 15

….When Frank is in the office working up a case he is always very quiet, and becomes greatly absorbed in what he is doing. He often sits with his pocket-handkerchief in his hand, with one corner between his teeth, quite lost to all that is going on around….

Jean Day tells more of the lives of neighbours living in the town of Worcester in the early days of last century.

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October 01, 2008

Chapter 14

Jean Day, in continuing her story of the people who lived in a Worcester crescent a hundred years ago, brings, by way of a letter, a glimpse of life as it was then in South Africa.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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September 24, 2008

Chapter 13

An unwelcomed seaside adventure features in Jean Day’s latest chapter in the account of the lives of neighbours in the English town of Worcester a century ago.

To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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September 17, 2008

Chapter 12

...Tom took us to La Longue Rocque, Le Route de Paysans, which is an impressive menhir, measuring 4 feet – the tallest on Guernsey. Folklore says that the fairies used to use the stone as a cricket bat but it is also said to increase fertility if touched. Mary laughed at the story, but she also did quite a lot of touching of it...

Jean Day continues her account of a group of Worcester neighbours in the first decade of the 20th Century.

To read earlier chapters please click on
http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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September 10, 2008

Chapter 11

...The boat sailed from Weymouth in Dorset and docked at St. Peter Port. There is a big castle just by the harbour called Castle Cornet, and pointing out to sea is a canon which booms out every day at midday, and it was going off just as we arrived...

The central character in Jean Day’s account of the lives of Worcester neighbours gives an account of a holiday in Guernsey in 1912.

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September 03, 2008

Chapter 10

…Last August was a very hot month, just the right weather for enjoying beach life at Shoreham, where the family had a bungalow. Frank made friends with some children in the neighbouring bungalows, and eventually could hardly shake them off; when he said good-bye to them at the back door, they immediately ran round the bungalow and appeared at the front, and followed him to the sea when he went to bathe…

Jean Day’s story concerns the lives of people living in the same crescent in a provincial English town a hundred years ago.

To read earlier chapters please click on
http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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August 27, 2008

Chapter 9

Jean Day gives an idea of the imaginative family entertainments of a century ago.

To read earlier chapters of Jean’s account of neighbours living in Worcester at the beginning of the Twentieth Century please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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August 20, 2008

Chapter 8

…Frank is an actor of no small ability. His star part was that of 'Sir Jeremy' in the Duchess of Bayswater, in which he sustained from start to finish the voice and affectations of a snobbish old malade imaginaire, a part exactly opposed to his own character. A stranger who saw him rehearse without make-up, seated in a bath chair said his cheery, healthy face and invalidish manner made up one of the most incongruous sights she had ever seen. His merry ways endears him to children. A small girl after taking a walk, through the town volunteered the remark that she had seen no one she liked the look of so well as Mr. Frank Tree. Another day some children remarked as he passed, 'There goes Charlie Chaplin,' evidently associating him with mirth….

Jean Day brings to life the residents of a crescent in the city of Worcester a century ago.

To read earlier chapters of her book please click on
http://www.openwriting.com/archives/lansdowne_crescent/

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August 13, 2008

Chapter 7

Jean Day continues her account of family life in the town of Worcester a hundred years ago.

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August 06, 2008

Chapter 6

…Talking of Charlie reminds me of a time when there was a play being performed by amateurs somewhere in the town so we lent a few articles of furniture which had to be conveyed to the hall, among other things a large armchair. In Sidbury I met the dray slowly proceeding towards the hall, and in the arm-chair was Charlie calmly reading, quite oblivious of his surroundings…

Jean Day brings to life’ the residents of a crescent in the city of Worcester a century ago. To read earlier chapters of the book please click on Landsdowne Crescent in the menu on this page.

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July 30, 2008

Chapter 5

Jean Day continues her story of the families who lived in a crescent in the city of Worcester in the early days of the Twentieth Century.

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July 23, 2008

Chapter 4

Jean Day continues her word-portrait of a Worcester street and the people who lived in it around a hundred years ago.

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July 16, 2008

Chapter 3

Jean Day’s novel concerns the lives of families living in a crescent in Worcester in the early days of last century.

This week there is a letter from Malaya from a young woman who once lived in Lansdowne Crescent.

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July 09, 2008

Chapter 2

Jean Day continues her story concerning the families who lived in the same crescent in the city of Worcester in the early days of last century.

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July 02, 2008

Chapter 1

Jean Day’s new novel, Lansdowne Crescent, recreates the lives of people living in an English city in the early days of the 20th Century.

Jean’s story, the result of intensive historical research, will be appearing in weekly episodes.

Continue reading "Chapter 1" »

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