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Life Is Too Short To Drink Bad Wine: 63 - Eager To Start

"There was no time to be sad. In fact I was feeling rather excited when I thought of the future. I realized that as one part of my life was coming to an end another full of possibilities was just ahead…''

Gayle Woodward and her family move to the big city, Auckland. To read Gayle's story of family life in New Zealand from the beginning click on Life Is Too Short To Drink Bad Wine in the menu on this page.

A feverish fortnight of cleaning and organisation began. The wardrobes in each of the children’s rooms had to be cleared out. Toys that were no longer needed had to be given away or dumped.

We found a buyer for the pool which then had to be drained and disassembled. The lawnmower which still had petrol in its tank would not be allowed on the removal truck and Jeff’s collection of match boxes was deemed to a fire hazard as well. These things would be loaded on to our trailer which Woody would tow to Auckland.

All curtains were washed and the walls in kitchen, bathroom and laundry were washed down too. There was no time to be sad. In fact I was feeling rather excited when I thought of the future. I realized that as one part of my life was coming to an end another full of possibilities was just ahead. I had no job to go to in Auckland, but I was keen to look and eager to start.

The trip to Auckland went well, if slowly. My little purple Hillman Avenger car was not very powerful and Mark and I had to struggle to keep up. But Woody was towing a heavily loaded trailer and often stopped so we could catch up. We arrived in the city late at night and drove to Mum and Dad’s place to spend the night.

The next morning we were up early because the removal truck was due at eight o’clock. The children streamed through the ‘new house’ shouting “MY room!” as they found their way around the sprawling house.

Carol was there waiting with us as the truck inched its way backwards up the long narrow driveway. She had offered to help unpack and I had gratefully accepted. It was good to have some old friends close by again. So while the children unpacked their own things and I went around helping to make beds in each room, Woody arranged the lounge and dining room and Carol and I unpacked the hundreds of small items for the kitchen. The kitchen was so small that seldom used items had to be put into the second kitchen downstairs.

The first night we had fish and chips for dinner and all was going well until the insurance man arrived. It seemed we had to insure this house from the moment of occupation because the company policy was to have their share insured. The man wrote many notes on the size of the house (large) and the materials it was built from (concrete blocks and cedar wood with an iron roof).

He then announced the amount of the premium which we would need to pay. I looked at him aghast! We had nothing left in the bank and nothing in our pockets, purses or cheque book. We had not thought about the expense of insurance. The man saw our discomfort and agreed to let us pay for six months only. We wrote a cheque knowing that salary would go into the account the next day to cover it. This was a saving grace because we never had to worry about money to pay for expenses again.


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