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A Potter's Moll: Slowly To The Repair Shop

...The woman driving the Nissan Micra, which had very bad damage to its front end, shouted that I had been driving too slowly and when I said that it was the fourth such incident she said: ‘There you are, you see, you must drive too slowly!’...

Potter’s moll Liz Robison had an unwelcome “surprise’’ on her birthday this month.

To read more of Liz’s ebullient columns please dclick on A Potter’s Moll in the menu on this page. And do visit the Web site of her internationally-famous potter husband Jim Robison http://www.jimrobison.co.uk/

It was my birthday last week and a very wet and gloomy day it was. As I drove home I came upon some roadworks, a sign saying SLOW RAMP and a big metal sheet over a hole in the road. As I slowed down, CRUNCH, the car behind did not.

This will no doubt amuse the editor of openwriting.com, because this is the fourth time this car has been run into in just over a year.

The woman driving the Nissan Micra, which had very bad damage to its front end, shouted that I had been driving too slowly and when I said that it was the fourth such incident she said: ‘There you are, you see, you must drive too slowly!’

Anyway, her insurance company phoned the same day to admit liability, so no worries there; but its all the palaver – hire car, repairs to own car, phone calls etc. I certainly would not recommend a Chevrolet Kalos (the hire car) – it’s like driving a sewing machine.

Potter husband Jim has placed ten garden pots in a garden designer friend’s garden which will be open to the public next weekend. They look spectacular in the outdoor setting, but then the garden itself is a wonder. He also keeps chickens so we had half a dozen delicious eggs too.

A couple of old work colleagues bought me a birthday lunch. While it was nice to catch up on college gossip it does not make me want to go back there one jot. Pastures new are still revealing themselves to me after four years retirement.

In a previous column I mentioned a book called Black Diamonds by Catherine Bayley – about the rise and fall of the Fitzwilliam family who lived at Wentworth Woodhouse, near Rotherham who made their vast fortunes from coal. It was an absolutely riveting page-turner of a book, a social history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries which I read in one weekend and which I recommend highly.

I am now enjoying Fire and Steam: How the Railways Transformed Britain by Christian Wolmar. Again there are elements of social history as well as chronicling the spectacular engineering and building achievements. Have you ever paused to ponder the origin of the phrase ‘running out of steam?’

The choir I sing with has regular fund-raising events. Last weekend was the Sopranos Summer Saunter. The sopranos provided the food, the rest of the visitors paid £5. There was a raffle and a Bring and Buy table, and all together we raised £150. Not bad for a very pleasant and sociable occasion. And those who sauntered through fields and along lanes came back to find the washing up had been done by those who stayed behind.

I still had time to catch the last hour of the Huddersfield Welsh Society Garden Party which raised about the same amount. Oh, glory be for sunny June days when we get them!

Family camping trip to the Lake District next weekend. The other members of the party will take part in GO Ape – tree swinging and mountain biking. I shall do what I did when the kids were little – stay in the caravan and make the sandwiches in peace. Oh, and saunter round a lake or two, of course. More from me in a fortnight

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