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A Shout From The Attic: The Best Toffee Ever Tasted

...My fatherís family had history in Castlegate. Grandma Lina Willis Bray, the girl from Scarborough, lived in a cellar there at some time and made toffee and fudge that she sold to keep body and soul together in the bad years when Grandfather Oliver Bray was not behaving himself in a civilised and domesticated way...

Ronnie Bray continues his life story. To read earlier chapters please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/a_shout_from_the_attic/

Next on the wheel of my life was St Johnís Road that went from the centre of town out to places unknown and undiscovered. Its natural boundary was the left-hand side of Fitzwilliam Street where john William Street ended just an bridge width after Viaduct Street lurched off downhill to be near the railway. There was a fish and chip shop no more than ten steps away from the start of St Johnís Road, but it stood on foreign soil and, therefore, was only to be used in extremis. Bath street ran from Highfields Road down to St Johnís Road, and although my friend Peter West lived in the basement of the second house down, I had no other friends in the neighbourhood because they all went to a different school,

Bradford Road went out on the bottom of town through old Northgate, across the road from the wastelands where the slums of Castlegate had been cleared about the time that I first breathed in the smoke-laden atmosphere of industrial Huddersfield.

My fatherís family had history in Castlegate. Grandma Lina Willis Bray, the girl from Scarborough, lived in a cellar there at some time and made toffee and fudge that she sold to keep body and soul together in the bad years when Grandfather Oliver Bray was not behaving himself in a civilised and domesticated way. Chris and Russ Morrisí grandma, Alice Peate, who came from that neighbourhood, said it was the best toffee she ever tasted.

Grandma and Grandpa Bray had several children. One of them was my Aunt Clara. She died aged sixteen when her cotton dress caught fire as she combed her hair to go out dancing while looking at her reflection in the living room mirror that hung above the fireplace.

I did not cross over the road to the Castlegate side until I had passed under the railway viaduct that straddled the road just before the beginning of Alder Street. After that point, I could go all the way to Fartown Bar before running out of safe territory.

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