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Diamonds And Dust: 30 - Moon Landing

…When the moon landing happened in July 1969 we all gathered round the radio day and night to listen as VOA describe the events as they happened. While I was at work, the guys that came off night shift would gather in my room and listen for a few hours to the events as they unfolded…

But that was a bitter-sweet timefor the guys working at a remote Namibian diamond mine, as Malcolm Bertoni reveals.

To read earlier chapters of Malcolm’s vivid experiences please visit http://www.openwriting.com/archives/diamonds_and_dust/

To obtain a copy of his book click on http://www.equilibriumbooks.com/diamonds.htm

In 1969, while I was working at Affenrucken, the Yanks landed on the moon. We had very little news about what was happening in the outside world as radio reception was pretty crap due to the distance from the normal radio coverage. There was no such thing as FM, and the AM stations were too weak and too far to receive. So you had to listen on the SW frequencies to get any stations.

In early 1969 I had bought a really good radio. It was a Grundig Satellit and cost me a fortune. But it was very powerful and I could pick up all the SW stations such as BBC World Serve and Voice of America (VOA) and some others that I can’t remember. It was a great radio. I took it with me to Australia and must have had it for more than 20 years.

So when the moon landing happened in July 1969 we all gathered round the radio day and night to listen as VOA describe the events as they happened. While I was at work, the guys that came off night shift would gather in my room and listen for a few hours to the events as they unfolded.

It was a bitter-sweet time for me. Here was all this technology being used to take people to the moon and we could listen live to what was happening. Yet we couldn’t get decent phones at Affenrucken, as they were so unreliable as to be almost useless. In emergencies we had to use the walkie-talkie radios that were in the vehicles. I know that by about 1980 they had reliable phones out at Affenrucken, but by then the place was not far from closing anyway.

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