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The Day Before Yesterday: This 66 - Divvy Day

...We were never short of wood for kindling, with the woods so close, the strong winds of winter would remove branches and even dead trees sometimes. All this was free for the taking...

Glayds Schofield continues her account of family life in wartime.

Three times a year the Co-operative Society paid us a dividend in goods, depending on how much you spent. Sometimes it would be jams and biscuits and others, household cleaners and so on. We got goods that year worth four shillings for every pound we spent. It was quite exciting wondering what we would receive each divvy day.

We were never short of wood for kindling, with the woods so close, the strong winds of winter would remove branches and even dead trees sometimes. All this was free for the taking.

It was rather late in the year to 'dig for victory', maybe it was as well for any bit of green showing was quickly devoured by my chooks who could find the smallest break in the fencing to get out. This was the time of year they would drop off laying and change their feathers looking very shaggy again. I wasn't completely without eggs this year, as one small yellow hen kept laying her eggs well into winter. She was much smaller than the rest but the trim little bird was worth her weight in gold.

The nights were drawing in and we were getting thoughts of Christmas. I had already seen and bought a teddy for Alan. It was nearly as big as he was. I thought it may take his mind off the cat, which he was forever trying to carry around the house. She never scratched him, she must have known he was only a baby. It's a wonder really, when she hated dogs so much.

My father was making a toy farm for Alan and spent many hours working in his workshop on this. He had taken over what must have been a stable at one time, as it had a door in two halves. He could close the bottom for privacy and open the top for light. He still loved making things as he did when I was young.

Alan would try to sing the popular songs on the radio. He could string the words together quite well, his favourite was "you are my sunshine, my only sunshine". He just loved this song, no wonder its popularity lasted so long.

We had funny shows on the radio too, designed to keep the morale of the people up, with skits and jokes about the enemy. I've always been a softy for the sentimental songs and there were plenty of them too.

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