« The Kebab Guy | Main | A Game For Losers »

The Day Before Yesterday: 82 - A Great Birthday Present

...We were approaching the due date of my confinement with everything ready as usual. I was not taking chances this time. I got the niggling pains of slow labour during the night and for the next three nights. The pains disappeared in day time but on Saturday, there was a change this time. The niggling pains continued throughout the day. My dad called in. "Just wondering how things are," he said.

On seeing I was still on my feet, his next question was "Do you think you can hold on until morning lass? It would be a great birthday present for me.''...

Gladys Schofield gives birth to a third son.

To read earlier chapters of Gladys's life story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/the_day_before_yesterday/

More changes were going on in the family. Ted often got leave and had a girlfriend in England. On one leave they got married and he took Irene back to Germany with him to live in the married quarters.

They were now there to keep the peace as a large wall was built between the East and West with Russia ruling over the East. Germany had started two World Wars. They said they would not get a chance to start a third.

My brother Alan also had found a girl he cared for. Her name was Mary. She had a young son called Ronnie. I liked Mary. She turned out to be a nice sister-in-law and Dorothy would visit Mum with Jeanette and sometimes come our way but always on her own these days.

May was a lovely month, the trees were almost fully out now in their light green foliage. The evenings were also drawing out. I had done quite well in this pregnancy apart from the aching legs which meant I was more or less confined to home. We were approaching the due date of my confinement with everything ready as usual. I was not taking chances this time. I got the niggling pains of slow labour during the night and for the next three nights. The pains disappeared in day time but on Saturday, there was a change this time. The niggling pains continued throughout the day. My dad called in. "Just wondering how things are," he said.

On seeing I was still on my feet, his next question was "Do you think you can hold on until morning lass? It would be a great birthday present for me.''

I knew too well it was his birthday in the morning and also knew when the chance came I was not holding on for anybody and by teatime we began to notice a change in the urgency of the pains and decided to inform the midwife. She wasted no time in arriving after Cliff had informed her. I had been in slow labour for three days and after examining me she announced the baby was making good progress.

The baby had made a wise choice as Saturday evening suited us all. The children were dispatched a little earlier to bed than usual these sunny evenings and Cliff was home to take care of things.

We got another visitor that evening. My sister Dorothy on her way home from seeing Mum, called in also and decided to stay awhile, just hoping. She didn't have long to wait as herself and Cliff were soon ordered out of the room for a little while. They chose to sit in the tiny kitchen, Cliff on top of the upturned Dolly tub and Dorothy perched on a small stool.

The thought of a daughter had been abandoned long ago as Cliff was sure we were going to have a football team and had already chosen a name for this baby. It was Frank, the name of one of his friends. I didn't care for the name myself but having chosen Rodney's name it was only fair he should have his way this time.

David Frank was born at eight forty that evening. A little smaller than the other two boys, being just six and a half pounds. No complications, everything straightforward. As he was more the shape of Alan than Rod, we decided to call him David, as he was so close to his Granddad's birthday and after the initial crying when he was born he slept all night giving me a chance to have a long earned rest.

He always was the quietest of the boys and I recovered more quickly from this birth.

He was just one week old when Cliff played in the final game of soccer. You still were not allowed up until your baby was ten days old but one afternoon would not hurt. I knew if the game was lost and Cliff hadn't participated in it, we would all carry the blame. After all, I had my two small sons for company and I may get a visitor during the afternoon, so after making me comfortable and everything within reach, off he went.

We didn't get any visitors after all and I missed the neighbour who had become my friend. It seemed so long ago, apart from letters, we hadn't seen them since they moved. Anything of interest from the toy cupboard had long since been abandoned on the floor and Rod was now perched on the end of the tiled hearth, where a broken tile forever fascinated him as he tried to fit each fragment into the right order. Alan was hungry and was reaching the biscuit tin for me when we heard the quick step of Daddy.

Everyone tried to speak at once as Alan complained of some misdeed his younger brother had got into. Those two still didn't hit it off together for long and yet they both liked their baby brother, although the novelty of his appearance in the family had long since worn off, so I wondered was four years better than two and a half between children.

My thoughts were interrupted by Cliff talking about some incidents in the match he had just played. It seemed they had lost the cup game and this was not going down at all well but at least he was not lame this week.

Categories

Creative Commons License
This website is licensed under a Creative Commons License.