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The Day Before Yesterday: 123 - Friends For Life

...Sunday being the only day to lay in a little while longer, we were surprised to see our oldest daughter, about ten years of age, carrying a tray with our breakfast on it. We each had a piece of toast, which looked fine but the greasy looking egg, still wallowing in its fat was stone cold. Also the tea, well cooled with the leaves on top instead of below...

Naturally Gladys Schofield and her husband said "Thank you''.

Gladys continues her autobiography. To read earlier episodes please clicki on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/the_day_before_yesterday/

We could also travel further afield to the markets now. These had always held a fascination for me and many a bargain adorned the shelves and drawers on these trips.

We could have had a nasty accident one day when Linda was three. Seatbelts were not compulsory and she had acquired a set of bubble blowing equipment. She kept standing up to blow her bubbles. We were unaware, the door beside her was not locked properly. Cliff, turning a corner to get out of town, made her lean against the door handle and she over balanced as the door opened. Cliff stopped as quickly as possible, luckily the frightened little girl was only suffering grazed knees and was seen by the oncoming traffic. All she bothered about was her tin of bubble blowing liquid which had spilled at the side of the road.

Children's fashions were lovely when they were small with lots of frills, silks and silver brocades, with stiff skirted, frilly petticoats underneath. Linda had a pink dress and Pauline, a silver one, just for special occasions. I made Susan a red one of soft voile material. It took me ages to get the gathered skirt evenly fitting into the bodice, with collar and puffed sleeves trimmed with white lace. It looked lovely. I had no modern gadgets for my machine, all seams had to be double, to prevent fraying. But this young madam dressed in her finery, climbed the tree next door, putting her knee on the fine gathers. The material and bodice parted company. It never looked quite the same after that.

Susan was always a leader and never let anything defeat her. If she made friends, she kept them for life, she had a strong character and was always reliable but also very generous. She was only young when we sampled her first attempts at cooking. Sunday being the only day to lay in a little while longer, we were surprised to see our oldest daughter, about ten years of age, carrying a tray with our breakfast on it. We each had a piece of toast, which looked fine but the greasy looking egg, still wallowing in its fat was stone cold. Also the tea, well cooled with the leaves on top instead of below. We looked at the beaming face before us and thanked our daughter for her efforts.

I taught her how to make biscuits and buns early. She took an interest in this as did both the other little girls as they grew older. They each had a tiny rolling pin and cutters to make biscuits in fancy shapes. Even when I baked bread, as I often did at this house, they would each make a tiny teacake to bake in the middle of my tins. Admittedly their cakes looked very grey looking when they had finished moulding them. Dad would always sample them when offered and remark they were 'scrumptious', his remarks always seemed to delight them.

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