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The Day Before Yesterday: 132 - A Nasty Shock

...He was rather a bewildered man, we would hear about him from time to time as the years passed. On one occasion he hid his money in the oven, thinking it was a good hiding place. Unfortunately he forgot about it when he turned the oven on and burned sixty pound notes...

Gladys Schofield continues her entertaining account of a busy family life. To read earlier episodes of her story please click on http://www.openwriting.com/archives/the_day_before_yesterday/

Cliff and Rod would watch the horse racing on the television on Saturday afternoons. They would pick a likely winner in a race or two and off Rod would go to the local bookmaker to place their bets of six pence each way, on the chosen race, then home he would come fuil of anticipation, to encourage ihe chosen horses through the race. They never won much, or lost much but seemed to get a lot of fun trying.

Susan would help me to bake sweet things on Saturday mornings, helped by her two younger sisters. This was a job I could safely leave to Susan now. She enjoyed it. I always thought food tasted better cooked in the side oven, heated by coal.

The children now knew of the coming baby. My girls were thrilled, I wouldn't have any signs of jealousy this time. Our only problem being we had not saved the baby gear, thinking our family was complete. We were soon told by Susan "My friends sister was selling a pram, just eleven months old if we cared to see it", knowing babies were soon in strollers these days, we went to see it. It was a lovely expensive model, with a sunshade, that could be attached in the warmer weather and well worth the asking price, so we bought it. We got a new carry cot that fixed onto a stand, as this would be handy in the first few months. Car seats for babies were not in use yet.

Linda was proving to be a good knitter, being able to follow a pattern at a young age. One morning as I was buying knitting wool, she asked if I would buy her some also to make a matinee coat for our expected baby. She was only just eight at this time and I thought I would end up doing most of this myself but agreed to let her try. She proved me wrong and needed very little prompting and made a tiny blue jacket, with a small lacy pattern around the bottom.

Ted's family had beaten us and had increased their family again. His wife, Irene had presented him with a son this time. They named him Geoffrey, a little blond boy. It would not be long before they too would emigrate to Australia, the youngest being only nine months when they went.
It sounded as though most of the family had got the bug, as Brenda and Ralph were finding it hard to make a living in our changing country.

Dorothy, who had long ago untangled herself from her hurried marriage, had brought up Jeanette single handed. Her husband never married again. He was rather a bewildered man, we would hear about him from time to time as the years passed. On one occasion he hid his money in the oven, thinking it was a good hiding place. Unfortunately he forgot about it when he turned the oven on and burned sixty pound notes.

Jeanette visited her dad more often after she got married. Dorothy helped her a lot with the grandchildren but Jeanette was not so close, after she got to know her dad again. Frank, her husband was a hard man to like, so when he and Dorothy didn't get on too well I wasn't surprised. They began visiting Brenda quite a lot and were closer in age to her. Jeanette's dad didn't live very long after that.

I got a new washing machine when i was six months pregnant, it was more modern than the old one, being a twin tub, the washing would spin half dry without the use of rollers.

The first time I moved the washing into the spinning part of the machine, I got a nasty electric shock. This really worried me so far into my pregnancy but my baby seemed as lively as ever. We called the firm, the maintenance man said the electric wires in the spinner had been cut too short. The machine was replaced, I wouldn't dare use the same one again.

David had suffered an electric shock along with a friend, where we lived before. They had been to a fair in the neighbourhood, when a storm was approaching. To get home quickly, they took the short cut through the fields to the back of our property. A thunder bolt hit a corner of a building not far from them, knocking both boys to the ground. We were watching this through the window and were relieved to see them both get up again and run towards the house, as the rain began to pour down. They said they felt the shock go right through them, they were very lucky that day.

Not long after that, his bike had an argument with the bonnet of a car, ending with David going over the top of it. He was lucky to only get slight concussion and was a very sickly lad for a day or two, while he was in hospital, so any time he is annoying someone or acting the fool, we kid him saying "That knock on the head must have been worse than we thought".

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