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Feather's Miscellany: Dreams

John Waddington-Feather suggests that dreams give us a foretaste of a life to come.

“The soul in sleep, above all other times, gives proof of our divine nature,” said Cicero. And certain it is that in dreams we wander into other dimensions of time and space. Freed from the body, we enter the kingdom of dreams, the domain of eternal youth. And like all youth life is lived intensely there. Love, friendship, pain and fear reach levels frail mortality could not sustain. And mercifully dreams end when fear or pain reach thresholds which turn them into nightmares.

I have a recurring nightmare. I’m young, back in the army. I’m a paratrooper again preparing to drop, being pushed in my stick up the fuselage of the plane; pushed by some terrible unseen being behind me who’s slashed my canopy. I remonstrate. Nobody listens or cares. I’m forced inexorably towards the exit. I reach the door and struggle, still trying vainly to pull back. But no! I am forced out by the fiend behind. Gasping and sweating with terror I fall into space - then wake up! Anchored once more safely in bed.

I often wonder if death’s like that. A dreaded push, a terrifying drop into the unknown from which we’re suddenly scooped into the safety of another life; a state of being where we continue to live and grow. Our souls lifted from the abyss of oblivion to a life where we meet for real again, as we meet only in dreams now, the dead who’ve gone on before. Laughing and chatting as we always did. Rejoicing in the Great Reunion in Christ.

Dreams, I do believe, foretaste the life to come; give insight beyond present mortality. Insight to a life which holds more fully the gaiety, the fun, the satisfactions and at times the serenity we experience already in our present state of transience, where, as St Paul would have it, “We look dimly through glass.”

John Waddington-Feather ©

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