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A Shout From The Attic: Faith Lost And Found - 3

...As I put my hand on the doorknob to enter the meeting room, a very curious thing happened. I experienced a blinding flash of warmth and light and heard myself say, I am going to be one of these people. Who or what these people were I had no idea. Composing myself, I entered the room...

Ronnie Bray attended a service that was to change the course of his life.

The second week that Peter and I had visited Ramsden Street and were on our way to the church behind the cafe, I noticed that the market place was crowded. I went across to have a look and was pleased to find a couple of young American men preaching from the plinth of the market cross. Knowing about America and Americans from my interface with Hollywood, I was very curious to get closer. Crossing over the road and standing to listen to the speakers I was approached by a tall, handsome man who introduced himself as Elder Tew. I thought he meant Elder Two, and that they were all called Elder with a number added. He gave me some literature and invited me to attend their services the following Sunday.

Next Sunday I went alone - Peter would not come - to Nine Rosemary Lane below Kirgate and climbed the long flight of stone steps to an upper room. As I put my hand on the doorknob to enter the meeting room, a very curious thing happened. I experienced a blinding flash of warmth and light and heard myself say, I am going to be one of these people. Who or what these people were I had no idea. Composing myself, I entered the room.

I can still picture the outstretched hands and beaming smiles of all those who were at church that sunny August day in 1950. I was made very welcome and felt right at home. What I did not know then, but was soon to realise, was that I was at home!

I had fallen among Mormons. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints had enjoyed a presence in the British Isles since 1837 and, intermittently, in Huddersfield since the 1840s. Two of the premises they used were at Orchard Street, Primrose Hill, and somewhere in King Street in town. In August 1950, the meeting hall at 9 Rosemary lane was secured on rent from Huddersfield Borough Council at a cost of 26.00 per quarter. It marked an important phase in the revival of the Huddersfield Branch of the Church after a long period of absence.

That the branch was established on this occasion is due to the efforts and vision of Kathleen Yull Crowther, whose story is told elsewhere. To many people familiar with traditional churches, the dependent branch must have looked ridiculous. That there were few members is true. That there was little organisation is also true; but what is equally true is that what was lacking in numbers or splendour in that place, was more than compensated for by the abundance and quality of the Spirit of God, and the Gospel love felt for one another. It was the start of a great adventure.

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